Sermons from 2020

Sermons from 2020

Trusting God When….

Trusting God When… Genesis 50:19-21 It’s fairly amazing how quickly the word obey became a taboo in our culture. Think about it. People would rather hear something ugly than be told to obey. Which is why stories like Joseph in Genesis are significant. He is held up for his obedience as an illustration of trust, and even love, for God. Understanding Joseph helps us see the truth behind Jesus’ words “Whoever has my commands and keeps them is the one who loves me.”

Good News of Great Joy

In Luke chapter two, an angel announced the “good news” of Jesus’ birth to shepherds in a field (Luke 2:10), a passage that has since become a standard Christmas tableau. Imagery of angels, shepherds, and sheep during the Christmas season intends to focus people on Jesus, but those familiar scenes often fail to capture the disconnect between the announcements of good news and the reality of Jesus’ birth and life. This lesson takes advantage of Christmas’ focus on Jesus’ birth to help us think about why it is “good news”, why some struggled to understand it in his day, and what it means for us today.

The Lord is…

The book of Nahum contains a small collection of poems announcing God’s judgment on Assyria and its capital city of Nineveh. God did not address its contents to us nor does it speak to any situation in our world, yet it’s message resonates with our world. This lesson briefly considers that resonance by exploring Nahum’s message and the applications it has for us today.

Two Years and Counting

Colossians 3:15-17 — 2020 has been a most unusual year. COVID sidelined many of the church-related patterns that, in many ways, define church life. While COVID’s disruptions created unease, fear, and frustration, they also revealed a number of blessings and created a number of opportunities for us in the 151st church family. This lesson will therefore consider a few of those things to help us think about the coming year and some things we might do to build on our strengths so that we can more effectively represent Jesus.

Unchristian

Unchristian Matthew 11:2-9 What do doubt and rejection have in common? Is it unchristian to experience one? Or both? After ten months of isolation, one of Jesus’ strongest supporters experiences doubt. To make matters worse, this follower spoke out in defense of the teachings of Jesus and against a moral evil. But now there is no end in sight to his isolation and rejection. This story provides assurance that doubt and rejection do not have to be what ultimately defines those who seek Jesus.

I am thankful… that Jesus rules

This month we have been considering some of the things revealed in the Bible that ought to motivate the thankfulness Paul described in 1 Thessalonians 5:18. Last week we looked at the order, purpose, and goodness God’s rule brings into our world. We recognize that God’s order, purpose, and goodness can sometimes be hard to see in our world. Too often, disorder, uncertainty, and pain seem to fill our world, making it difficult to feel thankful. But the Bible presents another aspect of God’s rule, an element that seeks to correct our world’s problems and that ought to engender an abiding thankfulness in us. This lesson explores that element and reminds us that we ought to be thankful people because God entrusts His rule to Jesus.

I am Thankful…that God Rules

The role science played in our recent presidential election reveals the prominent place it generally holds in our society. People who advocate for it portray it as a dispassionate, just-the-facts discipline that dispels the myths and wrong ideas that inhibit us. It allows us, they claim, to understand the physical laws that govern our universe so that we can do more and better things. Our society’s upon science creates a problem for many Christians because they find it difficult to reconcile science with Genesis’ account of the creation. That tension attracts attention and can result in people sometimes missing the points made in Genesis chapter one. We will consider some of the points Genesis’ opening chapter makes because they offer another reason for the thankfulness that defines us: We are thankful that God rules.

I am Thankful..That Life is more than this Life

Luke 12:23 — We generally associate November with Thanksgiving, a holiday that emphasizes thankfulness and family. The usual festive mood associated with Thanksgiving, however, sit uneasily in front of the problems troubling our nation this year – the pandemic, economic hardships, apocalyptic-like wildfires, nation-wide protests, and racial and political violence. While our situation might seem unusual and worrisome to us, the Bible offers a picture of life that gives us reason to be thankful regardless of our circumstances. So, this month, we are considering some of the reasons that motivate our thankfulness even in our challenging times. This lesson continues the series by examining the second reason for our thankfulness – We are thankful because there is a life after this life.

I am Thankful because I am Free

We generally associate November with Thanksgiving, a holiday that emphasizes thankfulness and family. The usual festive mood associated with Thanksgiving, however, sit uneasily in front of the problems troubling our nation this year – the pandemic, economic hardships, apocalyptic-like wildfires, nation-wide protests, and racial and political violence. While our situation might seem unusual and worrisome to us, the Bible offers a picture of life that gives us reason to be thankful regardless of our circumstances. So, this month, we will…

It’s Complicated

Job 34:10-16 Do you think you would do a good job if you were responsible for “repaying everyone for what they have done” and giving everyone “what their conduct deserves”? Do you think God does better? Is He somehow better equipped to untangle our complicated world of right and wrong, justice and mercy? Job admits he couldn’t do better and says: “If God withdrew his spirit and breath, all humanity would perish together and mankind would return to the dust.” When we are discouraged by all that is wrong with the world and ourselves, and baffled by how complex and difficult hardship can be, we need to spend time thinking on all that is right with God.

Always Being Prepared – Communion

Certain beliefs and practices define us as a religious group in our thinking and other religious groups’ thinking. Because we have a responsibility to be “prepared to make a defense” for the things we believe (1 Peter 3:15), we need to have a conversational understanding of our beliefs and practices that we can share with others. This lesson continues a series looking at some of the more apparent beliefs and practices that tend to define us, things like baptism, communion, and music in worship, and will offer a biblical explanation for them. In particular, this lesson explores our beliefs about the Lord’s Supper: We believe the Christian practice of communion follows the Jewish observance of the Sabbath while reinterpreting it through Jesus’ death and resurrection.

Always Being Prepared – music in worship

Certain beliefs and practices define us as a religious group in our thinking and other religious groups’ thinking. Because we have a responsibility to be “prepared to make a defense” for the things we believe (1 Peter 3:15), we need to have a conversational understanding of our beliefs and practices that we can share with others. This lesson continues a series looking at some of the more apparent beliefs and practices that tend to define us, things like baptism, communion, and music in worship, and will offer a biblical explanation for them. In particular, this lesson explores our beliefs about music in worship: We believe the changes in worship that accompany the transition from the Law of Moses to the Law of Christ include moving from Levitical musicians to congregational vocal music.”

Always Being Prepared – the Church

Certain beliefs and practices define us as a religious group in our thinking and other religious groups’ thinking. Because we have a responsibility to be “prepared to make a defense” for the things we believe (1 Peter 3:15), we need to have a conversational understanding of our beliefs and practices that we can share with others. This lesson continues a series looking at some of the beliefs and practices that tend to define us, things like baptism, communion, and music in worship, and will offer a biblical explanation for them. In particular, this lesson explores some of our beliefs about the church: We believe the church exists as God’s new Israel and has the responsibility of mediating between God and the world through its dedication to thinking and acting like Jesus.

Inconvenient Grace

Ruth 2:10-14Grace is simple enough for any believer to receive. But the whole truth of grace is big enough, infinite in fact, for us to grow into as well. Christians not only receive grace but grow in grace. They receive and grow so they can better live among those saved by grace. Do we long to be stronger believers in grace? May we have the courage to be inconvenienced by God’s grace.

Patterson on the Prophet Jonah

Jonah 1 — As we go through this life, it is no secret that at times we encounter great difficulty. Hardship therefore, is the reality that every believer should be ready (if not at least preparing) ourselves to face. The purpose of the message is to look at some key things we learn in the midst of our challenges that are invaluable to the Christian journey.

Always Being Prepared – to Explain our Beliefs about Baptism

Colossians 2:11-12 – Certain beliefs and practices define us as a religious group in our thinking and the thinking of other religious groups. Because we have a responsibility to be “prepared to make a defense” for the things we believe (1 Peter 3:15), we need to have a conversational understanding of our beliefs and practices that we can share with others. This lesson begins a series looking at some of the more apparent beliefs and practices that tend to define us, things like baptism, communion, and music in worship, and will offer a biblical explanation for them. We continue our series with our exploration of our beliefs about baptism – we believe baptism symbolizes Jesus’ death and resurrection and is required by God for participation in His covenant community and the enjoyment of His covenant blessings.

Always Being Prepared – to Explain our Beliefs about the Bible

Luke 24: 36-49 Certain beliefs and practices define us as a religious group in our thinking and the thinking of other religious groups. Because we have a responsibility to be “prepared to make a defense” for the things we believe (1 Peter 3:15), we need to have a conversational understanding of our beliefs and practices that we can share with others. This lesson begins a series looking at some of the more obvious beliefs and practices that tend to define us, things like baptism, communion, and music in worship, and will offer a biblical explanation for them. We begin our series in an obvious and foundational place; we begin with our convictions about the Bible: We believe God composed the Bible to tell the sweeping story of His relationship with humanity, a story that centers on Jesus and that provides the foundation for our beliefs and practices.

Love the Stranger

Acts 8:1-5–The first Christians were harassed and killed, robbed and evicted. The most significant action the individual Christian took was to focus on the next person they met, even if that person was a stranger. They acted like they believed the message of the gospel wasn’t just for people like them, but instead for anyone willing to follow Jesus.

Wisdom of the Early church – Dealing with Freedom

Many people in our nation are currently debating the nature of freedom and its relationship to law and to others. While a number of people have articulated insightful and influential perspectives on the idea of freedom that offer some intellectual context for the debate, we look instead to the ruler of the kingdom in which we claim citizenship; we look to Jesus who announced that he came to “proclaim liberty to captives” (Luke 4:18) and we look to the example of the early church as people living out the liberty he proclaimed. We will therefore consider the early church’s teachings about freedom as a way to help us think about the freedom being debated in our nation today.

Wisdom of the Early Church – Dealing with Racism

Ephesians 2:11-22 Regardless of what one thinks about the phrase “black lives matter”, it represents a truth about our nation – we live in a society that politicizes race. And, despite claims that we have become a more ‘enlightened’ society, the strong reactions that phrase solicits from people reminds us that race really does matter in our county. Given the current turmoil surrounding race in our nation, we will consider the way the early church responded to the division it encountered between Jews and Gentiles and explore what guidance its response offers us.