Sermons by Joshua Hartwigsen

Sermons by Joshua Hartwigsen

History of Division: Conquest and Judges

Judges 2: 11-19 The books of Joshua and Judges cover a long and dark period in Israel’s history. The story begins in a promising way, narrating the faithfulness of Joshua and the leaders who worked with him, before quickly moving into a summary of Israel’s cancer-like unfaithfulness that spread throughout the nation and nearly destroyed it. The dark realities of the nation during that time resulted in truly disturbing stories in the books. Our discomfort with those stories can, however, cause us to miss the insights they offer into humanity through its depiction of the relationships the Israelites had with themselves, with the people around them, and with God. This lesson considers the books of Joshua and Judges and explores what lessons they offer us.

A History of Division: Israel in the Wilderness

Movies occasionally produce characters whose identity becomes reduced to a memorable line. Consider, for example, the line, “I’ll be back” from the movie Terminator. Arnold Schwarzenegger voiced the line in his role as a robot from the future sent back in time to perform a mission and the now-iconic phrase captured his unfeeling commitment to accomplishing that task. God similarly reduces Israel’s identity in the story of their exodus from Egypt. Rather than using a phrase, however, God focuses on the nation’s responses to His activity in its life – they constantly grumbled against Him. This lesson considers Israel’s complaints recorded in the books of Exodus and Numbers, what insights it offers us into their relationship with God, and how their story offers us perspective on our own lives.

A Most Unusual Coronation

President Biden’s recent inauguration elicited numerous comments. The absence of the crowds that usually attend a presidential inauguration and the debates swirling about the legitimacy of the election combined to make his inauguration the most unusual one in recent memory. People connected to Biden’s administration consequently tried to give context to the abnormal event, working to give the ceremony legitimacy and a sense of normalcy. We expect important events to follow specific, prescribed patterns and we feel the need to offer explanations when they fail to meet those expectations. Jesus, however, commonly turned those anticipations upside down and often challenged expectations rather than explaining his actions. Consider, for example, his inauguration – the gospels record Jesus’ inauguration taking place through his betrayal and death and the challenges his path to ‘power’ created for his followers. Even though people Jesus’ time struggled to understand and accept the means of his rise to power, Christendom today celebrates that event through its observance of Easter Sunday. We will take advantage of that focus in this lesson by giving attention to how Jesus’ death and resurrection became the unexpected means of his exaltation and what it means for our lives.

A History of Division: The Patriarchs

Genesis 18:16-19 –The Bible’s story opens with a compacted, yet masterfully narrated, account of God’s grand plan for humanity and of humanity’s rebellion against Him and His plan. God responded to humanity’s rebellion in a surprising way – He promised to bless the whole world through a man named Abraham. The introduction of Abraham results in the dramatic slowing of the Bible’s story as it traces the development of the promise through Abraham and his family. This lesson will consider Abraham’s family in the book of Genesis and their relationship to God and His promise as part of our ongoing series exploring the story of humanity in the Bible.

Rivers of Life

John 7: 37-38 The four gospels record many memorable things said by Jesus, words that have been providing hope, comfort, and encouragement to people for the past two-thousand years. Sometimes, however, the time separating us from Jesus’ sayings and our familiarity with them conspire to cause us to miss the import of his teachings. This lesson will consider Jesus’ promise in John 7:37-38, exploring how Genesis offers a backdrop for understanding his claim about God’s plan for those who believe in Jesus. In particular, the lesson will give attention to what it looks like to be a ‘river of life’ person.

A Promise to Bless the World

Genesis 22:18–The Bible’s story opens with a grand vision of God’s intentions for humanity only to be quickly followed by a lengthy section tracing humanity’s persistent rebellion against God and His intentions. Humanity’s rebellion, however, did not negate God’s good intention. Beginning in Genesis chapter twelve, the Bible traces God’s promise to bless humanity by restoring His grand vision. This lesson will consider that promise and its fulfillment as part of our ongoing series considering humanity’s story in the Bible.

A Derelict Monarchy

Genesis 3: 1-6 This lesson continues an exploration of humanity’s story in the Bible and its relationship to our 2021 theme of “bonding”. In particular, this lesson consider humanity’s response to the honored place God gave them within the creation as the ones to whom He entrusted rule over His creation – humanity chose to rebel against God and His plan for them. The Bible’s narrative emphasizes the disorder and evil created by humanity’s rebellion, giving special attention to the ways in which it impacted the relationships God created humans to enjoy.

Love Story

The 1970 Academy-Award winning movie Love Story traces the relationship of wealthy heir Oliver Barrett and working-class Jennifer Calleveri. Oliver, against his father’s wishes, married Jennifer, a decision that motivated his father to disown him and withhold the family’s wealth and privilege from him. Happy but struggling, the movie follows the young couple as they begin their life together until a tragic illness takes Jennifer’s life early in their marriage. The movie ends with Jennifer’s death bringing reconciliation between Oliver and his father, marked by Oliver telling his sorrowful father, “Love means never having to say you’re sorry.” We respond to stories like the one told in Love Story not merely because they narrate universal human experiences of love and loss, but because we sense a certain nobility them. I suspect we respond to those stories because they reflect aspects of God who “is love” (1 John 4:8). God’s identity as love shapes the Bible’s narrative, which tells a great love story. We will therefore consider the Bible’s love story in this lesson and what it means for our lives.

Kings and Queens

Genesis 1: 26-28 Well-written stories introduce main characters in both memorable and prescient ways. Whether subtle or heavy-handed, those introductions set the boundaries within which we come to understand the characters and the stories they inhabit. That storytelling technique helps us appreciate the way God introduces humanity in the Bible’s carefully crafted narrative. We will, in this lesson, briefly consider humanity’s introduction in the Bible and how it both prepares us to understand the rest of the Bible’s story and how it helps us understand our place and purpose in the world.

Kingdom Behavior

Matthew 5:19-20–This lesson concludes a three-lesson series considering Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, a series encouraging us to look back to Jesus’ teaching to help us move forward into the new year. Our first lesson explored the reality and nature of the kingdom Jesus talked about in the Sermon on the Mount while the second lesson considered the rule Jesus assumed over that kingdom. We continue our focus on Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount in this lesson by considering the behavior his rule expected from those in his kingdom, which reveals an important focus – kingdom behavior focuses on the proper treatment of others.

Kingdom Rule

Matthew 7:24-29 This lesson continues a three-lesson series considering Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, a series encouraging us to look back to Jesus’ teaching to help us move forward into the new year. We spent time last week exploring the reality of the kingdom that formed the heart of Jesus’ teachings. We continue our focus on Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount in this lesson by considering the rule over the kingdom he talked about in his sermon, which outlines an important message – God has given Jesus rule over the kingdom of heaven.

Kingdom Reality

We tend to associate the beginning of a new year with the possibility of new and good things. That anticipation is tempered by our recognition that we have to work to realize many of the good things we hope to see. As we move into 2021, I want us to consider Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount, to look back to his teaching to help us move forward into the new year. We will, over the next few weeks, consider three messages from the Sermon on the Mount that will hopefully compose a perspective that will guide us throughout this year and help us realize the good things God wants to be part of our lives. We begin in this lesson by considering the reality of the kingdom Jesus talked about in his sermon, which focuses us on an important message – we live in the present as representatives of Jesus’ kingdom’s future arrival.

That They may All be One

John 17: 20-23 The 151st church family has the following mission: we exist to live, and help others live, a purposeful life by being more like Jesus. Our mission expresses itself in through: = Growing – developing our understanding of God’s Bible and developing ways of helping us faithfully live out those understandings. = Bonding – developing a deeper relationship with God that reveals itself through our deepening relationships with one another. = Sending – identifying ways to both serve and teach the people and communities around us with the goal of one day planting another church. Last year focused on “growing”, the first of the three expressions of our mission. This year we will focus on the second of the three purposes – “bonding” – and explore the Bible’s teachings about relationships and the place they hold within our effort to be more a Christlike church family. Bonding’s goal focuses on helping us cultivate united, Jesus-centered relationships with one another through which we evidence, and develop, our relationship with God. This lesson introduces our focus for 2021 by offering a brief overview of bonding’s place within the Bible.

Good News of Great Joy

In Luke chapter two, an angel announced the “good news” of Jesus’ birth to shepherds in a field (Luke 2:10), a passage that has since become a standard Christmas tableau. Imagery of angels, shepherds, and sheep during the Christmas season intends to focus people on Jesus, but those familiar scenes often fail to capture the disconnect between the announcements of good news and the reality of Jesus’ birth and life. This lesson takes advantage of Christmas’ focus on Jesus’ birth to help us think about why it is “good news”, why some struggled to understand it in his day, and what it means for us today.

The Lord is…

The book of Nahum contains a small collection of poems announcing God’s judgment on Assyria and its capital city of Nineveh. God did not address its contents to us nor does it speak to any situation in our world, yet it’s message resonates with our world. This lesson briefly considers that resonance by exploring Nahum’s message and the applications it has for us today.

Two Years and Counting

Colossians 3:15-17 — 2020 has been a most unusual year. COVID sidelined many of the church-related patterns that, in many ways, define church life. While COVID’s disruptions created unease, fear, and frustration, they also revealed a number of blessings and created a number of opportunities for us in the 151st church family. This lesson will therefore consider a few of those things to help us think about the coming year and some things we might do to build on our strengths so that we can more effectively represent Jesus.

I am thankful… that Jesus rules

This month we have been considering some of the things revealed in the Bible that ought to motivate the thankfulness Paul described in 1 Thessalonians 5:18. Last week we looked at the order, purpose, and goodness God’s rule brings into our world. We recognize that God’s order, purpose, and goodness can sometimes be hard to see in our world. Too often, disorder, uncertainty, and pain seem to fill our world, making it difficult to feel thankful. But the Bible presents another aspect of God’s rule, an element that seeks to correct our world’s problems and that ought to engender an abiding thankfulness in us. This lesson explores that element and reminds us that we ought to be thankful people because God entrusts His rule to Jesus.

I am Thankful…that God Rules

The role science played in our recent presidential election reveals the prominent place it generally holds in our society. People who advocate for it portray it as a dispassionate, just-the-facts discipline that dispels the myths and wrong ideas that inhibit us. It allows us, they claim, to understand the physical laws that govern our universe so that we can do more and better things. Our society’s upon science creates a problem for many Christians because they find it difficult to reconcile science with Genesis’ account of the creation. That tension attracts attention and can result in people sometimes missing the points made in Genesis chapter one. We will consider some of the points Genesis’ opening chapter makes because they offer another reason for the thankfulness that defines us: We are thankful that God rules.

I am Thankful..That Life is more than this Life

Luke 12:23 — We generally associate November with Thanksgiving, a holiday that emphasizes thankfulness and family. The usual festive mood associated with Thanksgiving, however, sit uneasily in front of the problems troubling our nation this year – the pandemic, economic hardships, apocalyptic-like wildfires, nation-wide protests, and racial and political violence. While our situation might seem unusual and worrisome to us, the Bible offers a picture of life that gives us reason to be thankful regardless of our circumstances. So, this month, we are considering some of the reasons that motivate our thankfulness even in our challenging times. This lesson continues the series by examining the second reason for our thankfulness – We are thankful because there is a life after this life.

I am Thankful because I am Free

We generally associate November with Thanksgiving, a holiday that emphasizes thankfulness and family. The usual festive mood associated with Thanksgiving, however, sit uneasily in front of the problems troubling our nation this year – the pandemic, economic hardships, apocalyptic-like wildfires, nation-wide protests, and racial and political violence. While our situation might seem unusual and worrisome to us, the Bible offers a picture of life that gives us reason to be thankful regardless of our circumstances. So, this month, we will…