Sermons on 1 Corinthians

Sermons on 1 Corinthians

Foods and Selflessness

1 Corinthians chapter eight contains part of Paul’s response to a question raised by the Christians in the city of Corinth – he told them to think less about their rights and more about their selfless service to one another. This lesson examines Paul’s response as part of our series examining the selflessness that ought to define our lives as followers of Jesus.

Non-NEGOTIABLES

1 Corinthians 1:10 The desire for unity has pervaded human consciousness from the beginning of its history; God created us to be united. Our sins, however, keep us divided. That dilemma provided the backdrop for Paul’s message for the Corinthians in which he called for them to be united. Paul’s call for unity goes far beyond merely a call to “get along”; he told the Corinthians that God expected them to “united in the same mind and the same judgment” (1 Corinthians 1:10). This lesson will outline some of the non-negotiable truths that play a role in the unity that ought to define us.

The Death of Death

1 Corinthians 15:12-28 Paul believed the good news of Jesus’ resurrection changed everything and offered the foundation upon which Christian thinking and living built itself. We should therefore ask ourselves, as people who claim to believe in Jesus’ resurrection, does it offer the same foundational, life-changing place in our lives that it held within Paul’s life?

The Community Assembled

Scripture: 1 Corinthians 10:14-22 We often think only of our vertical relationship with God when we think of the purpose of “worship services.” By the very fact that whatever we do in these assembles we do together, fellowship becomes a part of it. The church is a distinct community, and this distinctiveness shows when we come together. The church is a loving community, and the loves shows best when we are together. Each “act” of worship is an expression of community, and sometimes the horizontal element is more obvious than the vertical.

Grow in the Small Things

Scripture Reference: 1 Corinthians 1:26-31 Abram has all the markings of adulthood. He is of age. He has struck out on his own. Abram worships God wherever he goes. He is married, and although childless, cares for his nephew Lot. Is Abram’s faith ready for adulthood? Genesis 12 is an illustration of the concept in 1 Corinthians 1:26 where God uses seemingly small things to shame those who boast in their strength. Before Abram becomes the great father of our faith, God uses everyday challenges like hunger and fear to humble Abram and keep him focused on living faithfully. Much of our Bible’s credibility comes from its willingness to critique even its greatest heroes.